University of Kentucky
Department of Veterinary Science
Lexington, KY, USA

(859) 218-1168

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©2017 by The Shaffer Lab

Dr. Shaffer attended the University of Kentucky and obtained a Bachelors of Science in Agricultural Biotechnology. She earned a PhD in Microbiology and Immunology from Vanderbilt University and completed postdoctoral fellowships at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech, NIH Postdoctoral Scholar). She began her appointment as an Assistant Professor of Microbiology in the University of Kentucky Department of Veterinary Science in April 2017, and has joint appointments in the College of Medicine (Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics) and College of Pharmacy (Pharmaceutical Sciences). Dr. Shaffer is fascinated by the inner workings of bacterial secretion systems and mechanisms governing microbial pathogenesis. Her ultimate goal is to create a dynamic and creative laboratory environment that fosters the scientific development of the next generation of young investigators.

Assistant Professor

Department of Veterinary Science

Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Carrie L. Shaffer, PhD

Zach attended the University of Kentucky (Agricultural Biotechnology) and Eastern Kentucky University (double major in Biology and Homeland Security). He is currently pursuing a Master of Science in Network Security Management. While attending UK, Zach was Chellgren Fellow and a US Air Force ROTC Cadet. Prior to joining the Shaffer Lab, Zach's research focused on analysis of mutation rates of the GAG gene in the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (a virus closely related to HIV). His work in EIAV was selected for presentation at six undergraduate research conferences and has been published in multiple veterinary and equine research journals. Zach's research in the Shaffer lab focuses on elucidating the role of uncharacterized H. pylori cag T4SS components in molecular cargo delivery to host cells, and determining the mechanism by which synthetic small molecules inhibit T4SS activity.

Research Analyst

Department of Veterinary Science

Zach Willand

Hailing from Sydney, Australia, Liz earned her Bachelor of Science in Animal and Veterinary Bioscience (with Honors) from the University of Sydney. During her undergraduate training, her research focused on developing veterinary molecular and genetic diagnostics and understanding how the equine gut microbiota changes in horses over time. She joined the Shaffer Lab in August 2017. Her project focuses on understanding how the soil-dwelling pathogen Rhodococcus equi evades host defense mechanisms to cause respiratory disease.

Graduate Student (PhD)

Department of Veterinary Science

Elizabeth Boudaher

A Pikeville, KY native, Lynn is visiting Doctor of Veterinary Medicine student. Her project focuses on developing a Rhodococcus equi transposon mutant library and evaluating new antimicrobials to combat equine respiratory disease.

Graduate Student (DVM)

Lincoln Memorial University College of Veterinary Medicine

Lynn Leedhanachoke

Emily is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science and she aspires to attend veterinary school. Her project focuses on understanding expression of genes that control biogenesis of cell surface structures in Rhodococcus equi

Undergraduate Research Assistant 

University of Kentucky

Emily Stinnett

Carly is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science and she aspires to attend veterinary school. In addition to assisting more senior laboratory members, her projects include cloning, protein expression analysis, and generating bacterial mutants. 

Undergraduate Research Assistant 

University of Kentucky

Carly Lyle

Keaston is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Biotechnology and Animal Science (double major). He is currently applying to veterinary school. Keaston performed his ABT Independent Research Project in the Shaffer Lab. His research focused on analyzing the role of H. pylori cag T4SS components in interactions with the host cell. 

Undergraduate Research Assistant 

University of Kentucky

Keaston Johnson

Former Lab members